Background

Brighton Illustation de­gree Un­til 5 years ago in-house il­lus­tra­tor for greet­ing cards, very com­mer­cial In-house work not very easy to find Strug­gled to get his own ideas in, Got fired

Got in touch with uni friends at Marshmallow Laser Feast

Hey! This page con­tains em­bed­ded con­tent from Vimeo, who might use cook­ies and other tech­nolo­gies to track you. To view this con­tent, click Allow Vimeo con­tent.

Helped them on their first pro­ject for Vodaphone (Projection map­ping is awe­some)

Marshmallow Laser Feast did com­mer­cial work, but they brought their own am­bi­tions and ideas to the table. This in­spired me to start do­ing more in­de­pen­dent work in be­tween pro­jects.

Hey! This page con­tains em­bed­ded con­tent from Vimeo, who might use cook­ies and other tech­nolo­gies to track you. To view this con­tent, click Allow Vimeo con­tent.

Video for Sony, more ad­vanced pro­jec­tion map­ping this time around.

Influences

Getting Work

A group of men in formal dress dives into a sewer. Paper money flies out from a suitcase.

A group of people interacts with a complicated machine powered by a water wheel.

Hey! This page con­tains em­bed­ded con­tent from Youtube, who might use cook­ies and other tech­nolo­gies to track you. To view this con­tent, click Allow Youtube con­tent.

Worked with Marshmallow Laser Feast on Squarepusher VR mu­sic video

Standup Stuff

Questions

What course did you do at Brighton University?

I did BA Illustration. It was also durig that time that I got in­ter­ested in an­i­ma­tion and things.

Can you talk a bit more about how the Squarepusher VR ex­pe­ri­ence was cre­ated? How did you col­lab­o­rate with pro­gram­mers, an­i­ma­tors and so on?

It all starts with big sto­ry­board. I’ve done a lot of sto­ry­board work, so that worked well. We then brought in an­i­ma­tors, pro­gram­mers (who had with VR be­fore) to dis­cuss what could and could not be done based on the given time­frame and tech­ni­cal lim­i­ta­tions.

We had to do some clever things to save mem­ory and pro­cess­ing power, like lim­it­ing the num­ber of shapes and us­ing the same ar­chi­tec­ture more than once with dif­fer­ent tex­tures.

Traditional sto­ry­telling does­n’t re­ally trans­late to VR where you don’t know what the per­son will be look­ing at.

During your ca­reer, did you ever have to sit down and teach your­self about things like per­spec­tive?

I did learn some of my tech­nique at Brighton, but other than that it’s lots of ex­per­i­ment­ing. Sketching things out, tak­ing them to a fin­ished stage and look­ing at how things work and what works and what does­n’t. And this works the same way with tech­nol­ogy (projection map­ping, VR). I picked up a lot of skills from pro­gram­mers I worked with, and on top of that there’s tons of re­cources freely avail­able on­line.

What per­cent­age of your ed­i­to­r­ial clients want an­i­mated im­ages?

Around half and half. A lot of pub­li­ca­tions are not printed any­more, an­i­ma­tion is def­i­nitely on the rise. If you can make an­i­ma­tion a part of your skillset it can gen­er­ate a lot of work for you. If your work al­lows for it, do ex­per­i­ment with an­i­ma­tion. Also, you don’t need to be a fully trained an­i­ma­tor to make sub­tle things move.

You men­tioned you work pri­mar­ily in Illustrator, but your work does have a lot of tex­ture. Can you talk about how you achieve that?

All my work is done in Illustrator. It’s a good de­vice to save labour. It makes it eas­ier to make pat­terns, re­peat things and bend el­e­ments around. I then use other soft­ware to add tex­tures to get that tac­tile feel­ing. The good thing about soft­ware is that you can just use it for one par­tic­u­lar thing with­out be­ing an ex­pert.